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Using the Japanese Writing system in Tagalog(Filipino)

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  • Using the Japanese Writing system in Tagalog(Filipino)

    Since Tagalog used to be written in Baybayin which just like Hiragana and Katakana is a syllabic and is an agglutinating language like Japanese, I've decided to devise a method of writing Filipino with the Japanese syllabics.
    There's 2 reasons for this.
    1.I'm a Japanophile
    2.Reading Filipino with Latin Alphabets is quite difficult, for eg:Nakakapagsisinungaling...is easier to read when written like this insteaad なかかぱっぐじじぬンりン(I've made some changes to accommodate "ng", "l" and consonant that don't end with a vowel. so instead of being read as Nakakapatsugujijinunrin it becomes Nakakapagsisinungaling)

    Here are the rules!
    Convert Japanese pronunciations to Filipino.(This can be done quite easily if you know both languages)(a, ba, ka, da, e, ga, ha, i, la, ma, na, nga, o, pa, ra, sa, ta, u, wa, ya)
    But then how about the words that don't end with a consonant eg:Nagtagpuan?(Found each other)
    It can't be Nagutagupuan(なぐたぐぷあん) right?
    Well I have a solution!
    We get rid of the pronunciation of つ as "tsu" and make it a diacritic mark!
    もっと(motto) this usage will be removed and instead っ will do this もっと(Mot) (repeating alphabets are rare or non existent in Filipino)
    but wait, there's a catch! っ can only be done to the "u" syllables (ぐ、く、る), why? To make it easier of course!
    Hence we can now write Nagtagpuan properly!
    なっぐたっぐぷあん.
    Now our biggest concern appears!
    The "l" sound is not there in Japanese..well "r" sounds like "l" but it's there in Filipino and appears alot, so we obviously can't say Tagalog as
    たがろっく(Tagaroggu) right? Well even this can be solved easily by making a new set of syllables! We take the Katakana "r" syllables and make them "l"!
    ラリルレロ(La,li,lu,le,lo)
    たがロっぐ(Tagalog)
    And last but not the least!
    The "ng" sound does not exist in Japanese..but even this can be solved by doing something similar to the former rule!
    Changing the pronunciation of ン from "n" to "ng"
    Now we can write words like Nganga!
    ンやンや(Yes, the youon readings and dakutens are still there)
    Now let's write a sentence using the rules I've made above!
    Ang pangalan ko ay si Roger(My name is Roger)
    あン ぱンやラん こ あい じ ろげっる
    Last edited by OppaiTaishō; 07-01-2015, 06:02 AM.

  • #2
    Well, I'm not Philippine and I obviously don't know Filipino but if Japanese language doesn't fulfill the needs to speak the language perfectly you are not helping too much people. Also you've used every single time つ(tsu) the big one, but もつと it's not Motto, it's Motsuto, what you meant is もっと. Not to mention the r and l problem.

    Sincerely I appreciate your effort but this has no sense at all.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Juas View Post
      Well, I'm not Philippine and I obviously don't know Filipino but if Japanese language doesn't fulfill the needs to speak the language perfectly you are not helping too much people. Also you've used every single time つ(tsu) the big one, but もつと it's not Motto, it's Motsuto, what you meant is もっと. Not to mention the r and l problem.

      Sincerely I appreciate your effort but this has no sense at all.
      Forgive me for I have made some mistakes.

      Okay, here's a simple explanation.
      We change the action that つ does on the other symbols.
      Instead of repeating the first consonant like
      もっと(motto), we remove the vowel of the symbol next to つ.
      So もっと becomes "mot"
      For the "r" and "l" thing, to integrate the Japanese writing system into Filipino, I've included only Hiragana and some Katakana.
      らりるれろ(Ra,Ri,Ru,Re,Ro) so ラリルレロ(La,li,lu,le,lo), hope you've understood.

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      • #4
        I've understood it from the beginning, the thing is that I don't think this really helps anyone since it's learning your personal method just to read Filipino with Japanese writing and to be honest, if they are different languages with different sounds and writing it's for a reason. In some examples you can get a mold and use it to explain certain things from other languages, as I see from this example, this is not the case.

        I mean, I'm quite sure that for everyone Mot is easier to read than もっと where you need to learn Japanese first and then apply your rules to get the same result. Once again, you spend a nice time doing this and that's really cool, but sincerely I don't see the point on mixing both languages. I understand you are learning the language and you are playing with all this stuff but this is something very personal and not easy to apply for other people.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Juas View Post
          I've understood it from the beginning, the thing is that I don't think this really helps anyone since it's learning your personal method just to read Filipino with Japanese writing and to be honest, if they are different languages with different sounds and writing it's for a reason. In some examples you can get a mold and use it to explain certain things from other languages, as I see from this example, this is not the case.

          I mean, I'm quite sure that for everyone Mot is easier to read than もっと where you need to learn Japanese first and then apply your rules to get the same result. Once again, you spend a nice time doing this and that's really cool, but sincerely I don't see the point on mixing both languages. I understand you are learning the language and you are playing with all this stuff but this is something very personal and not easy to apply for other people.
          Well there is no purpose, it's just interesting and fun.
          But it can help in some cases, as I've mentioned earlier, Filipino words can be quite difficult to read when agglutinated alot.
          Like, the phrase for..have you eaten yet will be "Nakakakain ka na ba?", "なかかいん か な ば", the latter is much easier to read.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by OppaiTaishō View Post
            Well there is no purpose, it's just interesting and fun.
            But it can help in some cases, as I've mentioned earlier, Filipino words can be quite difficult to read when agglutinated alot.
            Like, the phrase for..have you eaten yet will be "Nakakakain ka na ba?", "なかかいん か な ば", the latter is much easier to read.
            Indeed, the work you've done is fun (I don't go with the interesting thing since it lacks of any interesting fact or learning purpose) and Filipino may have very large words difficult to read for a foreigner but I see applying Japaneses hiragana and katakana and certain rules makes it easier.

            In fact look at your example you said "Nakakakain ka na ba?" but you wrote なかかいん か な ば which translated is Nakakain ka na ba missing one ka, so there's something wrong and I don't know where it is. I give you the credit for using syllables, thou but because of the lack of certain sounds in Japanese I don't see myself learning anything from this.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by Juas View Post
              Indeed, the work you've done is fun (I don't go with the interesting thing since it lacks of any interesting fact or learning purpose) and Filipino may have very large words difficult to read for a foreigner but I see applying Japaneses hiragana and katakana and certain rules makes it easier.

              In fact look at your example you said "Nakakakain ka na ba?" but you wrote なかかいん か な ば which translated is Nakakain ka na ba missing one ka, so there's something wrong and I don't know where it is. I give you the credit for using syllables, thou but because of the lack of certain sounds in Japanese I don't see myself learning anything from this.
              I forgot one か..damn.
              なかかかいん か な ば?
              Well, that's expected since it's not your first/second/third language.
              I forgot to mention this too, "ñ", Dasamriñas/Dasmarinyas, Antoñio/Antonyo(Yououn readings of にや/にゅ/にょ)
              だっすまりにゃっす and あんとんにょ
              Well maybe you can try integrating Hiragana/Katakana into Spanish..though I don't think that's possible..big changes would have to be made.
              This can also serve as a code language.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by OppaiTaishō View Post
                I forgot one か..damn.
                なかかかいん か な ば?
                Well, that's expected since it's not your first/second/third language.
                I forgot to mention this too, "ñ", Dasamriñas/Dasmarinyas, Antoñio/Antonyo(Yououn readings of にや/にゅ/にょ)
                だっすまりにゃっす and あんとんにょ
                Well maybe you can try integrating Hiragana/Katakana into Spanish..though I don't think that's possible..big changes would have to be made.
                This can also serve as a code language.
                Believe it or not, except for the lack of "l" and Hu sound (they have ha, hi, he and ho but "hu", it's fu) the sound is exactly the same in Japanese and Spanish that's also why for us is really easy to speak Japanese. And as I said I don't see the point on mixing two languages for the sake of it so I won't do it in Spanish but I'm sure that I would need less rules than you did with Filipino.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Juas View Post
                  Believe it or not, except for the lack of "l" and Hu sound (they have ha, hi, he and ho but "hu", it's fu) the sound is exactly the same in Japanese and Spanish that's also why for us is really easy to speak Japanese. And as I said I don't see the point on mixing two languages for the sake of it so I won't do it in Spanish but I'm sure that I would need less rules than you did with Filipino.
                  Oh, yeah, I've forgotten about the "Hu" sound in Filipino, maybe a new Jouon only for "Hu" can be formed ひゅ(Since, hyu is again non existent in Filipino.)

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                  • #10
                    About the R/L problem: The Japanese language indeed already has a way of writing "L" sounds: By applying a dakuten to the R katakana: ラ゙ リ゙ ル゙ レ゙ ロ゙
                    However this is not widely done because most writing in katakana is adressing Japanese people, who can't tell R and L apart without training. Hence it's only done in very pendantic contexts.

                    On a similar note, it also has a way of writting "ng" sounds: by applying a handakuten to the K syllables, this one is even alowed to do to hiragana: か゚ き゚ く゚ け゚ こ゚

                    That may help you revise the system you've devised to apply Japanese kana to Tagalog words.
                    Last edited by JAHT; 07-02-2015, 09:01 AM.
                    sigpic

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JAHT View Post
                      About the R/L problem: The Japanese language indeed already has a way of writing "L" sounds: By applying a dakuten to the R katakana: ラ゙ リ゙ ル゙ レ゙ ロ゙
                      However this is not widely done because most writing in katakana is adressing Japanese people, who can't tell R and L apart without training. Hence it's only done in very pendantic contexts.

                      On a similar note, it also has a way of writting "ng" sounds: by applying a handakuten to the K syllables, this one is even alowed to do to hiragana: か゚ き゚ く゚ け゚ こ゚

                      That may help you revise the system you've devised to apply Japanese kana to Tagalog words.
                      Well I still prefer the original system, since there's a clear distinction between "r" and "l" るル(Rulu)
                      Same with "ng".

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by OppaiTaishō View Post
                        Well I still prefer the original system, since there's a clear distinction between "r" and "l" るル(Rulu)
                        Same with "ng".
                        Dakuten and handakuten aren't clear distictions? (O_o)
                        How do you manage to read actual Japanese then?
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JAHT View Post
                          Dakuten and handakuten aren't clear distictions? (O_o)
                          How do you manage to read actual Japanese then?
                          He is talking about his rules to apply Japanese characters to Filipino. About the Dakuten I've never seen it before in any Japanese reading for Katakana.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Juas View Post
                            He is talking about his rules to apply Japanese characters to Filipino. About the Dakuten I've never seen it before in any Japanese reading for Katakana.
                            I know. I was half joking when I wrote that.

                            My source for the dakuten on ラリルレロ thing is Wikipedia fourth paragraph of that.
                            As I already said this is obviously really rarely done since only a Japanese writer who has extensive knowledge of at least one foreign language would be able to tell the difference between L and R him-/herself, so why bother?
                            You'd probably have to venture into academic writing to find those.
                            sigpic

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JAHT View Post
                              I know. I was half joking when I wrote that.

                              My source for the dakuten on ラリルレロ thing is Wikipedia fourth paragraph of that.
                              As I already said this is obviously really rarely done since only a Japanese writer who has extensive knowledge of at least one foreign language would be able to tell the difference between L and R him-/herself, so why bother?
                              You'd probably have to venture into academic writing to find those.
                              Any links?

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