Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

CPU Questions

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • CPU Questions

    Ok My Computer Is a 2001 Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 2.80GHz (2 CPUs) Win XP & ITS A DELL
    1
    Yes
    100.00%
    1
    Sorta
    0.00%
    0
    No
    0.00%
    0
    Last edited by Zetchzie; 05-01-2012, 10:34 AM.

  • #46
    The biggest difference is in how they handle memory. 32 bit operating systems can only directly address (use) 4 Gb of RAM. After that they are doing a bit of juggling called page swapping to get the memory into the addressable range, and the results are pretty unimpressive. 64 bit systems vary, but Windows 7 Pro x64 for example can address 192 GB of RAM. There are also some advantages to how it gets data in and out of the processor along with a couple of extra instructions, so overall 64 bit machines tend to be a bit better assuming everything else is equal. There are still badly written apps that can behave worse under a 64 bit OS than they do under a 32 bit OS, but they are getting rarer every day.
    Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.
    Douglas Adams, "Last Chance to See"

    Comment


    • #47
      ah, thats very informative.
      I guess i am fine. Should i lower my virtual memory settings or leave it as is?
      Thank you.

      Comment


      • #48
        I would set it to auto, and then change the debug memory dump to small dump. You get to that on the same page of the system properties where you see the link to performance settings at the top, go to the bottom in the Startup and recovery area, then change the memory dump from kernel dump to small memory dump. Two reasons. If your system thinks it might need to do a full kernel dump, it will want a minimum of a 6gb page file (this is how it makes sure it will have space for the dump), and bigger page files eat hard drive space and time as the system has to maintain them. Once you change the dump size, and reset the page file size to auto, you will probably see it shrink to about 2gb on the next reboot.
        Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.
        Douglas Adams, "Last Chance to See"

        Comment


        • #49
          alright, thanks for the instructions.

          Comment


          • #50
            hmmm i multiply mine by 1.5 x physical ram
            so yeah 4gb x 1.5= 6GB vram (i made it static, also i put it in the middle part of hard disk)
            was it good?

            Comment


            • #51
              If you open Task Manager, go to the performance tab. You will see a button at the bottom labeled Resource Monitor. If you open that, then go to the memory tab in the resource monitor, you can see how your machine is doing on physical and virtual memory. If you machine has very little free physical memory and the virtual memory utilization is high, you probably did the right thing in creating the page file manually. If, on the other hand, you still have plenty of free physical memory, chances are pretty good that you are actually reducing your performance and that things would work better if you switched your page file back to auto mode and set your kernel dump mode to small.
              Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.
              Douglas Adams, "Last Chance to See"

              Comment

              Working...
              X