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Thread: A Millennial Guide to Finding Work

  1. #1
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    Smile010 A Millennial Guide to Finding Work

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRHBi...layer_embedded

    Saw this linked on another forum and it enraged me. I'm all for "paying your dues" but things are getting ridiculous.

    In my parents (boomers) day part of the social contract was that you finished high school graduated and were guaranteed a good job,. My generation (Gen X) the social contract changed to graduating high school, going to college or university and then you would get a good job, The new social contract being marketed is, graduate from high school, get multiple degrees, work for free at a corporation to get marketable skills and then MAYBE you might get an entry level job to pay off your crushing student debt. This mentality is going to destroy what's made our nations great.

    The video above makes it very clear what corporations think of the whole "internship" thing. I believe the number he tossed around was "30 percent of their workforce". If you look on indeed.com and indeed.ca you can see for yourself how many new "internship" opportunities are out there. (just type intern or internship into the search field). Many corporations are retooling entire new programs based around unpaid labour (they usually have a fancy name for it) -- Example: http://thepmp.ca/pmp/

    Update
    http://www.reddit.com/r/videos/comme...that_its_free/
    Last edited by johnblade; 04-05-2012 at 06:59 PM.

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  3. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Ferrin View Post
    most jobs today are still the same fucking menial labor though
    employers just added a plethora of pretentious requirements on as prerequisite for what are still the same boring, brain dissolving jobs. and they can do this because the unemployment level is so high.
    its actually gotten to the point where they have come up with the term 'under employed' in a foggy attempt to cover people on 10 hour contracts.

    people in the uk are shit on big style for this since the government added their 'back to work' scheames which led to companies not replacing paid staff because they can get a steady flow of people on jobseekers being referred by government scheames that give people unemployment benefit of £40 or£50 a week to work 40 hours a week in 'work placements'.

    might as well call it 'the peoples required labor incentive' or some other commie bull shit.
    Meh I just don't know what to do. Most of those complicated sounding jobs just don't sound like something I would want to take up.
    That's why I might just get in the workers union and do something there.
    Everytime I stop, and stumble~ In doubt and darkness~ I close my eyes and think back to you~ We made a vow, a promise to carry onword~ I'll see it through~

  4. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novmbar View Post
    Here is some free advice. CNC operator, Nuclear technition, HVAC-R technition, Software design. Those are all growing fields of employment even now, and in fact there are more job openings in several than there are people with training to fill them.
    It still solely depends on the country. Our country still has that "labor mentality" that's why the in demand jobs are the technical ones and not the ones that involves the field of multimedia, computers or sciences.

    fuck this society


    “As if you were on fire from within. The moon lives in the lining of your skin."
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  5. I have a BFA in Sculpture, the fuck is this "real job" you speak of?

  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by omp1234 View Post
    I have a BFA in Sculpture, the fuck is this "real job" you speak of?
    that is not how you spell slavery


    “As if you were on fire from within. The moon lives in the lining of your skin."
    - Pablo Neruda


  7. hmmm...i always thought that the computer engineering market is expanding in an incredible rate considering everything practically depends on computers and their software. Hell, some of the low income earners i know bought themselves a lap top even though it will cost them around 100 hours of pay. however, some of you guys were saying that's not the case?

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Veneficae View Post
    hmmm...i always thought that the computer engineering market is expanding
    I'd agree with that. My country is currently marketing our open positions in IT to people in Portugal because we cannot find enough people here. On the other hand, companies also don't want to pay more even if they can't find enough people (they say I have a really impressive cv and they'd love me to work for them, as long as I don't dare to try to negotiate... ).

  9. #17
    As a "boomer" might I make an observation? Those who say that high school was all that was needed in the '60-'70s are mainly right. The workforce was smaller so jobs seemed more prevelant. Hell, in my area most male college students only used college to dodge the draft and party, and they now run this country. At that time we had jobs in manufacturing and research in this county, and it was very easy to get entry level positions almost anywhere. We had Case, Yardman, Walker, Firestone, GoodYear, Amtrack, and a plethoria af small firms that supported the major firms in the city I lived in. We had a major rail switching/repair depot which now is a great place to watch pigeons while waiting for the one passenger train which might stop. Those are all gone, some over EPA regulations, some just closed up because of rising union costs. The availabily of a qualified workforce was never a problem, but jobs chased out over too many regulations was. Then in the '90s enter the Temp which is the only way to get employment around here now. I know people who have worked as a temp for years, like my wife.
    Enter unions, EPA, and clean air. Exit most heavy manufacturing to areas that the local governments allowed jobs to be created. Less good paying jobs means less disposable income which leads to even less jobs in other fields until we got to the "professional student" hoping to find a field that payed well.
    Time changed and people got lazy. Lets make the US a consumer nation rather than a productive one and send the bad pollution elsewhere was the norm because of bad publicity mainly by the EPA, hence the outflow of jobs to other countries.
    The bottom line is there are way too many applicants for any job that opens making it easier to be more selective when hiring.
    In some respects I do put partial blame on that generation, not because they still work but in most instances because they were too busy pursuing their "dream", believing what their gov told them about all the prosperity to take time to show, teach their children the reality of having to work to pay the bills.
    Lets expand the nanny state more until no jobs without the appropriate gov sanction. OOps, we are already there.
    Last edited by bobuild01; 04-23-2012 at 06:11 AM.

  10. #18
    I guess I've been lucky, because I've had all paid internships (but I studied in the hard sciences...), but I know a lot of people that have had paid internships in all sorts of fields. They definitely exist. What I've seen is the people who are able to make it seem like they have the proper credentials are the ones who get the few paid openings in the lucrative fields.
    There are a lot of interviews that probably go like this, and that definitely doesn't help one get a decent position, paid or otherwise.

    [quote=johnblade]The new social contract being marketed is, graduate from high school, get multiple degrees, work for free at a corporation to get marketable skills and then MAYBE you might get an entry level job to pay off your crushing student debt[\quote]

    Part of the difference is that the world has advanced quite a lot since the 1950s, and 1970s, and even 1990s. There is a lot more information that's needed to make a person fully cognitive of their society and to be trained to deal with the more complex environment, thus the need for some sort of training past secondary school.This makes sense to me, intrinsically. Whether it's appropriate for everyone and their dog to be encouraged to go to university (or the like), is another topic entirely. The options are still open for most countries of a technical degree, but parents are not so obliging on having their child 'shut the door on their future' -- again, a different topic altogether.

    The point of internships is to bypass the entry level jobs. If you choose the correct internship, or, at least work your way up the internship ladder from the beginning of a 4 year degree, you can build the skillset that the entry level job has. That's how you get 2 years of experience (approx) to be ready to get a decent job when you graduate. So many people I went to school with expected that you go to college, and be present, and then, magically, you're in the '9-5 desk-job club' or 'dream job in x' -- and that sorely isn't the case. Internships are meant for people in the midsts of their studies (usually) or just graduated. If one only starts thinking about getting a job or actual experience after one's graduated, they're sorely behind :/ These people who didn't apply themselves aren't finding that skating through school and nabbing the degree is what it "was advertised" to be. That's partially societies fault, and partly the student's own fault for not taking account for their own future.

    Although, it's interesting to compare to the old school apprenticeship:
    Quote Originally Posted by the great and wonderful wiki
    Apprentices usually began at ten to fifteen years of age, and would live in the master craftsman's household. Most apprentices aspired to becoming master craftsmen themselves on completion of their contract (usually a term of seven years), but some would spend time as a journeyman and a significant proportion would never acquire their own workshop.
    Quote Originally Posted by 6531597
    and don't get me started on volunteering, that's pure bullshit too.
    I don't see volunteering as job experience because you are not responsible for whatever you
    are doing. if you fuck up, then the organization that lets you volunteer can't hold you
    responsible. (unless it's a crime of sorts) also, you don't get paid. food/gifts as compensation
    just doesn't cut it.
    It's also totally legit to work a different job and 'volunteer' in something at least related to your field. I'm pretty sure people who plan community events are held accountable if things go horribly wrong, but it usually doesn't, because these people want to be doing it... There's plenty of accountability in a lot of volunteer positions: logistics of a local marathon, that has accountability

    I agree with Ferrin, though: back to work programs are a hoax and a way for the companies that participate in them to get tax breaks and other niceties from the government. It's definitely not the way to get more of the population a 'decent job'.

    But, no matter which viewpoint we look from, the problem of finding a job in our current society is based on something ultimately different than just the education system, and just the job market, but something intrinsically wrong with how we all approach education and working in general.

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